The student news site of Fishers High School, Fishers, Indiana

Tiger Times

The student news site of Fishers High School, Fishers, Indiana

Tiger Times

The student news site of Fishers High School, Fishers, Indiana

Tiger Times

1890s postcard of the University of Berlin (now called the Humboldt University of Berlin). The school’s founder, Wilhelm von Humboldt, implemented a novel educational model at the university, which emphasized holistic, curiosity-driven learning, rather than exclusively vocational, market-driven learning.
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Jakob Polly, News Editor • March 15, 2024

In November of 1942, Congress lowered the minimum draft age to 18. Anticipating fierce Axis resistance in North Africa, Europe and the Pacific,...

Happy campus, happy academics
Happy campus, happy academics
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    When choosing a college 99 percent of the time students are searching for good academics rather than focusing on what the college campus...

Junior Sabrina Mari Alberty prepares for her solo during Sound’s “Kiss of the Femme Fatale” set at Spotlight Parent Preview Night. “Those extra practices really helped pull us together and refine everything so that it was ready,” Mari Alberty said. Parent Preview Night took place on Feb 1, 2024.
A shining silver spotlight
Gavin Auger and Emerson ElledgeFebruary 22, 2024

Black excellence in country music
Black excellence in country music
Katrell Readus, Opinion Editor • February 22, 2024

With Black History Month in full swing, controversy around Beyoncé's new country songs and my long-standing love for a good pair of cowboy boots,...

Classroom classics
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Riley McWilliams, Business Manager • February 20, 2024

Throughout a student's high school career, they’ll read a variety of books ranging from Shakespearean plays to thrilling novels. However, many...

Take it to Kourt: Hamilton vs. Flipped classroom

New to the ever-expanding list of tasks on a teacher’s agenda is the addition of occasional lessons that demonstrate the concept of a “flipped classroom.”

This new style of teaching, while providing college readiness, is not an effective method of learning for all students and not every high school course is designed to fit the mold of the flipped classroom.

Flipping classrooms became a part of mainstream education in 2007 when two teachers, Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams from Woodland Park High School in Woodland Park, Colo. discovered a method of recording PowerPoint presentations.

These presentations and lectures were then posted online in order for students who missed class to stay up-to-date with lessons, but are now also being used in place of traditional classroom learning.

Bergman and Sams then spoke to teachers across the country to show them the new lecture style. The more the idea spread, the more teachers began using video recordings as a tool.

Rather than the traditional in-class lecture style of learning, the flipped classroom-based lesson consists of students watching online lectures that teachers assign as homework. The next day’s class is used for students to complete an assignment based on the lesson from the previous night. During this time, teachers can then help students if they have questions while working on the assignment, rather than waiting until after the assignment has been completed to address questions.

This tactic may be useful for those students who require assistance to grasp a concept; however, students who understand the lesson, find themselves with an extra study hall added to their schedules once or twice a week due to being able to complete an assignment quickly. grasp the same concept. Not only does the flipped classroom style hinder overall understanding, but it also presents a challenge for courses that do not cover any material that could be flipped.

Of the four core classes, mathematics and science are available for flipping, whereas English and social studies do not cover material that lends itself to creating video lectures. Despite personal opinion, flipping has resulted in positive statistics in regards to grades. According to a survey conducted on www.grades does not make logical sense. The average teenager does not posess the attention span to sit through a 20-minute video on a topic that most likely does not interest them to begin with.

Take into account the fact that not all students watch the videos and the 85 percent of teachers noticing improved grades seems like an astronomically high number.

Additionally, there are students who cannot grasp a concept during an in-class lecture. If these students are left to teach themselves a lesson by simply watching a video, it is highly doubtful that they will understand the lesson without the ability to ask their teacher questions as the lesson proceeds.

The idea could be beneficial in preparing students for college-style learning, if there was not a whole day spent completing what would have been a homework assignment. In a college setting, students would be assigned the video and the assignment paired together in the same night.

Even though statistics reveal what seems to be a positive effect resulting from flipped classrooms, the reversed style creates a similar aspect to that of online courses. There is really no point in tradtional schooling, when students are teaching themselves material.

Give the tech-savvy generation a few years to adjust to technology-heavy methods of learning, and then the flipped classroom could show even better results that actually lead to effective learning.

Math teacher Steven Emerson uses a video lecture to teach his pre-calculus classes the concept of graphing logarithmic While most functions. students sophia.would not complain about additional time to work on homework, the class time would be better spent addressing common issues of the class, especially if several students are struggling to com, a website for teachers who hace flipped, 85 percent of 200 teachers who have made the flip have seen improved grades. However, this upward slope of improving.

grades does not make logical sense. The average teenager does not posess the attention span to sit through a 20-minute video on a topic that most likely does not interest them to begin with.

Take into account the fact that not all students watch the videos and the 85 percent of teachers noticing improved grades seems like an astronomically high number.

Additionally, there are students who cannot grasp a concept during an in-class lecture. If these students are left to teach themselves a lesson by simply watching a video, it is highly doubtful that they will understand the lesson without the ability to ask their teacher questions as the lesson proceeds.

The idea could be beneficial in preparing students for college-style learning, if there was not a whole day spent completing what would have been a homework assignment. In a college setting, students would be assigned the video and the assignment paired together in the same night.

Even though statistics reveal what seems to be a positive effect resulting from flipped classrooms, the reversed style creates a similar aspect to that of online courses. There is really no point in tradtional schooling, when students are teaching themselves material.

Give the tech-savvy generation a few years to adjust to technology-heavy methods of learning, and then the flipped classroom could show even better results that actually lead to effective learning.

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The student news site of Fishers High School, Fishers, Indiana
Take it to Kourt: Hamilton vs. Flipped classroom